Her Flag: Celebrate equality & natural heritage on March 21st

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36 states ratified the 19th amendment. 36 female artists designed stripes for Her Flag, a massive flag to commemorate these states.

I was selected to design Wyoming’s stripe! This Saturday, it will be sewn into the flag (which is ultimately 18 feed by 26 feet!).


Her Flag | Live (online) | March 21, 2020 @ 1:00 PM MDT

Join us through the live stream:
-Instagram link: https://www.instagram.com/herflag2020/
-Facebook link: https://www.facebook.com/herflag2020/


My design honors 36 women who inspired and informed my own understanding of equality. These women are all modern women, such as my sisters, mom, aunts, mother-in-law, mentors, and collaborators. Some of these women taught me to empower other women. A few taught me about natural history. One taught me how to teach people about science. Another taught me how to garden, and one introduced me to bluegrass.

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Left to right: My maternal grandmother, paternal grandmother, and two great aunts, joined by a pair of Wyoming’s iconic bison.

Intertwined throughout the stripe, I also added familiar elements of biodiversity that make a place home such as local wildflowers, the Wyoming toad, ladybug, chickadee, Indian paintbrush, beaver, yucca seed, bison, pronghorn, and more. The background is made of 36 four-patch quilt squares, sewn from my great grandmother’s quilt scraps.

More Information

Stay tuned for Wyoming-specific follow-up project I’m working on with support from the University of Wyoming Office of Engagement and Outreach!

Media Coverage

More details are available in the following links:

 

Suggestions for integrating drawing into university-level biology courses

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In October 2018, I published a commentary in Nature which synthesizes many of the key points in the guide below. You can view that open-access commentary here.




 

 

Click to download PDF version.

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I’m collaborating with the coordinator of a series of undergraduate Animal Biology labs this semester.

She is interested in integrating drawing more fully and effectively into the work that instructors and students do in those labs. The rest of this post provides context on what we’re aiming for, as well as a lot of resources I’m sharing with her. Continue reading Suggestions for integrating drawing into university-level biology courses

October 2016 Newsletter: Exploring creative thinking (downtime, research & more)

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Click image to view full newsletter.

Mid-semester, responsibilities, due dates, and life can feel overwhelming. But, taking breaks and doing “other” activities are essential strategies for fostering your own work and creative thought.

I’ve remarked many times that reading, writing, and drawing are three ways that I manage to ‘suspend’ time. In all three activities, my brain slips into a hyper-focused dimension in which I have no sense of time passing.

And while this brain space can be problematic when I have a finite amount of time for it, allowing ourselves to work and think outside of time is not just pleasurable, it’s really important.

After all, a body of research indicates that arts activities are often key to science breakthroughs.

This month’s newsletter shares a few perspectives on why and how to engage in leisure and arts activities.

Enjoy and happy thinking!

October Table of Contents

  • Sketching Tip: Reproduceability – Packing tape transfers
  • Artful Science: Creativity Research
  • Artful Classrooms: Necessary Leisure
  • Sketchbook Snapshot: Experimenting through repetition
  • News & Events:
    • Illustrated greeting cards for staying in touch with folks as autumn hits full-stride
    • Drawn to Wildlife (sketching for scientists workshop, hosted by the Wildlife Society, Wyoming Chapter)
    • Bee Germs illustrations are live!
    • University of Wyoming SciArt Symposium follow-up

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How to turn a home movie into high-octane "scicomm"

I’ve been exploring the intersection between sketching on location and eco-communication inspired by life a lot lately.

So, I couldn’t resist doing an eco-comm piece when I saw a couple of casual videos of my goddaughters exploring the Museum of the Rockies, a world-class dinosaur museum in Bozeman, MT.

This illustration was made by pausing the video, listening very carefully to one of the little girls describing her reaction to the museum, and sketching rapidly with Adobe Photoshop and an old-school Wacom drawing tablet (nearly as old as the fossils below).

 

Dinosaur museum_v7  (04.15.2014)