Commissioning SciArt Illustrations? Know what you want and what you can spend. (Using Images-A Best Practices Primer, Part 6)

This article is the sixth in a series aimed at helping you enhance your #scicommand #sciart by avoiding #visualplagiarism. It will do so by laying out some best practices for dealing with images (which are, by their nature) visual intellectual property protected by copyrights.

NOTE: I am not a lawyer, and no part of this article or series should be construed as legal advice. 

Please chime in, in the comments or by contacting me, if you have suggestions for how to enhance this article or the series.

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Knowing what you want can make commissioning illustrations way more efficient and enjoyable. This entails planning ahead, being decisive, making lots of choices, and balancing budget vs. other constraints. (Lepidoptera sketches from Saskatchewan, Canada; ©2017)

PLAN AHEAD, SO YOU KNOW WHAT YOU WANT AND WHAT YOU CAN SPEND.

In the last article, we discussed contract considerations, which are the core of any commissioned illustration project.

In this article, we’ll take a look at some other important elements of planning an illustration project. To increase efficiency (which usually helps with budgeting), do what you can to know what you want and how much you can spend before you approach an illustrator and ask if they are interested in working with you. Continue reading Commissioning SciArt Illustrations? Know what you want and what you can spend. (Using Images-A Best Practices Primer, Part 6)

SciArt illustration contracts for your science communication project (Using Images-A Best Practices Primer, Part 5)

This article is the fifth in a series aimed at helping you enhance your #scicommand #sciart by avoiding #visualplagiarism. It will do so by laying out some best practices for dealing with images (which are, by their nature) visual intellectual property protected by copyrights.

NOTE: I am not a lawyer, and no part of this article or series should be construed as legal advice. 

Please chime in, in the comments or by contacting me, if you have suggestions for how to enhance this article or the series.

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Hiring an illustrator doesn’t have to feel like wizardry. A well-written contract can simplify and enhance the experience. (Student assessing stream water quality, ©2017)

FAIR-TO-GENEROUS ILLUSTRATION CONTRACTS

In addition to the 4Cs of commissioning SciArt, there are four major considerations you will need to take into account when you work with an illustrator.

They are: contracts, what you want, your time frame, and what you can spend. This article breaks down the first of those, contracts. Continue reading SciArt illustration contracts for your science communication project (Using Images-A Best Practices Primer, Part 5)

March 2017 CommNatural Newsletter: Making connections between art & other disciplines

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Happy spring, dear readers!

The spring equinox was just a few days ago, and my tulips noticed. While they’re not in full bloom yet, they are several inches tall!

My thesis is due at the end of this week, so I spent most of last month writing, revising, or going on health breaks (hiking with the pup). So, the March 2017 newsletter takes a look at projects I’ve just published, along with some other people’s work.

Happy sketching,

March Table of Contents

  • Insight: Photo-realistic drawing expectations can get in your way.
  • Sketching Tip: Handy portable drawing materials
  • Artful Science: Learning by drawing
  • Artful Classrooms: Students explore connections between art and energy issues
  • News & Events:
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Jan/Feb 2017 CommNatural Newsletter: Snow sketching, winter vocabulary & more

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Happy not-quite-spring, dear readers!
Although we’re a long way from actual spring, the weather in my neck of the woods has been decidedly warm lately.

That means, I’ve been spending a lot of time outside, roving the prairie with my pup, and, to be honest, writing more than drawing. Even so, the January/February 2017 newsletter focuses on winter (or what’s left of it), things you can do indoors, etc.

Happy sketching,

Jan/Feb Table of Contents

  • Sketching Tip: Sketching Snow
  • Artful Science: Tips for integrating drawing into university biology courses
  • Artful Classrooms: Winter Vocabulary
  • News & Events:
    • Webinar: Tips for working with an illustrator; 2/22
    • Poem published in Montana anthology
    • I’ve been elected chair-elect for ESA SciComm Section!
    • Get your spring greeting cards and gifts from me! 🙂

 

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Sketchbook Snapshot: taking a closer look at winter vocabulary

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Though many a northerner might beg to differ with Robert Frost’s somewhat flippant statement – “You can’t get too much winter in the winter” – there is a truth to the poet’s words that became evident when I looked into winter vocabulary.

Wintry word origins

According to etymologyonline.com, the word winter likely derives from a combination of Proto-Germanic, Norse, Dutch, and Gaul words which meant “wet” or “white.” The word snow dates from circa 1300, shares linguistic roots with winter and was alternatively spelled “snew” until the 1700s. Continue reading Sketchbook Snapshot: taking a closer look at winter vocabulary