Drawn to Quebec: an illustrated newspaper column

Drawn to Quebec banner (07.2014)_v6 I’m delighted to announce that my illustrated column, Drawn to Quebec,  has been nominated for a provincial ‘Best Column Writing’ award! Scroll to the bottom for links to all the articles in the series, or keep reading to see what the nomination, from the Quebec Chronicle-Telegraph‘s editorial team, says: D2Q_Vineyard to Sante_QCT (12.17.2014)_5 “Bethann’s illustrated column, Drawn to Quebec, has been a breath of fresh air for the editorial team and our readership. Specifically, she raised our awareness of issues that we didn’t know. Her extensive knowledge of the natural world, combined with years’ of teaching experience, enable her to write in a conversational fashion, including the readers in her articles by using “we” and “our”. This approach has helped not just our readers, but our staff, feel as though they’re being spoken with (not at), and they’re actively participating in discovery and exploration of Quebec City’s nature/culture overlap. Continue reading Drawn to Quebec: an illustrated newspaper column

Illustrating Ecology…conferences, that is

*Images are from the ‘drawing for scientists’ section I led in a scicomm workshop at ESA’s 2014 annual meeting.

Researchers have demonstrated that drawing (even without training) can help clarify what you know, assist instructors in assessing student knowledge, and enhance public communication efforts. And, there is evidence that collaboration between scientists and artists may result in better science.

Continue reading Illustrating Ecology…conferences, that is

New illustrated column & sketching workshops!

I am absolutely thrilled to share some great news with you.

Today marks the third week of an illustrated column – Drawn to Quebec – I have begun penning for North America’s oldest newspaper.

Drawn to Quebec_sketching en plein air_QCT (07.16.2014)_2 Continue reading New illustrated column & sketching workshops!

3 reasons why we should tell stories about scientists, not just science.

1. Human details tangibly bring Conserving Quebec caribou_Ia story to life.

Being able to relate to a researcher is key to having an interest in what that person researches. When a science story includes the scientist, a reader can hope for a quirky anecdote, a personal revelation that is highly intriguing, or even a zany description of the scientist’s physical attributes. Continue reading 3 reasons why we should tell stories about scientists, not just science.