November 2016 newsletter: SciArt Animation & Sharing

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Sharing SciArt can be fun for everyone!

I’ve been busy working on illustrations for an exhibit of my “Ecologically True Story of the Tortoise and the Hare” project. As a result, I’m in a sketching mood, and I’ve started sending drawings hither and yon.

Last month’s sketching tip focused on making stickers from our drawings, as a way of making reproductions we could certainly share.

But this month, I’m in the mood for sharing with no intermediate process. So, I’m suggesting you sketch on the packages you mail, and illustrate the letters you send (and send a letter!). ūüôā

In general, this month’s newsletter focuses on ways of, and ideas for, sharing SciArt.

Enjoy and happy sharing!

November Table of Contents

  • Sketching Tip: Best practices & ways to share your SciArt
  • Artful Science:¬†Animating your SciArt
  • Artful Classrooms:¬†Sharing Inspiration
  • Sketchbook Snapshot:¬†Tortoise & Hare sketches from illustrations in-progress
  • News & Events:
    • Get your holiday cards and gifts from me! ūüôā
    • Drawn to Wildlife (sketching for scientists workshop, hosted by the Wildlife Society, Wyoming Chapter)
    • Tortoise and Hare project update: new project website & spring exhibition dates selected
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News: SciArt for Children

 

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For almost¬†a year now, I’ve been contributing natural history and science illustrations+text to a gorgeous children’s magazine called root & star.

My pieces have provided artful science-based exposure to fur, fish nests, chicken language, and coming soon, things that live in/under snow!

In the next year, I’ll focus on natural history collections, raccoon “hands,” horses, magpies, and the wind.

I’m telling you about root & star because:

I think it’s a phenomenal way to engage children in artful thinking and exploration. I love the magazine¬†and love being part of it. There’s no monetary benefit to me if you subscribe¬†or pick up a copy at one of¬†the retailers now stocking¬†it.

But, that’s fine — I only hope¬†you’ll find it wonderful, too!

Sketchbook Snapshot: illustrating tortoises and hares

“Too much importance cannot be given to drawing, as it is not only an excellent device for securing close observation, but it is also a rapid method of making valuable notes.”

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Inspired by Louis Agassiz, the Harvard Committee of Ten insisted that drawing be an essential part of science education at their institution. While this curricular edict was issued in 1894, it is a learning and research recommendation whose value I rediscover every time I work on the “Ecologically True Story of the Tortoise and the Hare.”

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Right now, I am chipping away at storyboards and draft text for¬†a¬†version of the story which will be exhibited at the University of Wyoming Biodiversity Institute in Spring 2017. Continue reading Sketchbook Snapshot: illustrating tortoises and hares

October 2016 Newsletter: Exploring creative thinking (downtime, research & more)

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Mid-semester, responsibilities, due dates, and life¬†can feel overwhelming. But, taking¬†breaks and doing “other” activities are¬†essential strategies for fostering your own work and creative thought.

I’ve remarked many times that reading, writing, and drawing are three ways that I manage to ‘suspend’ time. In all three activities, my brain slips into a hyper-focused dimension in which I have no sense of time passing.

And while this brain space can be problematic when I have a finite amount of time for it, allowing ourselves to work and think outside of time is not just pleasurable, it’s really important.

After all, a body of research indicates that arts activities are often key to science breakthroughs.

This month’s newsletter shares a few perspectives on why and how to engage in leisure and arts activities.

Enjoy and happy thinking!

October Table of Contents

  • Sketching Tip:¬†Reproduceability – Packing tape transfers
  • Artful Science:¬†Creativity Research
  • Artful Classrooms:¬†Necessary Leisure
  • Sketchbook Snapshot:¬†Experimenting through repetition
  • News & Events:
    • Illustrated greeting cards for staying in touch¬†with folks as autumn hits full-stride
    • Drawn to Wildlife (sketching for scientists workshop, hosted by the Wildlife Society, Wyoming Chapter)
    • Bee Germs illustrations are live!
    • University of Wyoming SciArt Symposium follow-up

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Artful Science: Creativity Research

There’s a lot of research into creativity and critical thinking.

What’s particularly relevant are studies looking at how arts integration can influence, and often enhance, both creativity and critical thinking beyond the arts.

Below,¬†I’ve quoted four articles that speak to this point, but there are many others. Get in touch for more! Continue reading Artful Science: Creativity Research