Sketchbook Snapshot: taking a closer look at winter vocabulary

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Though many a northerner might beg to differ with Robert Frost’s somewhat flippant statement – “You can’t get too much winter in the winter” – there is a truth to the poet’s words that became evident when I looked into winter vocabulary.

Wintry word origins

According to etymologyonline.com, the word winter likely derives from a combination of Proto-Germanic, Norse, Dutch, and Gaul words which meant “wet” or “white.” The word snow dates from circa 1300, shares linguistic roots with winter and was alternatively spelled “snew” until the 1700s. Continue reading Sketchbook Snapshot: taking a closer look at winter vocabulary

July 2016 Newsletter: Getting buggy

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Click image to view full newsletter!

July Table of Contents

  • Sketching Tip: 4 insect sketching tips
  • Artful Science: Biomimicry illustrated
  • Artful Classrooms: National Moth Week opportunities
  • Sketchbook Snapshot: “Buggy” sketches & illustrated cards
  • News & Events:
    • Illustrated greeting cards for staying in touch this summer
    • UW English 1010 teaching colloquium
    • Best Environmental Story award
    • Rocky Mountain Front research
    • National Park Service/UW residency

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Drawn to Quebec: an illustrated newspaper column

Drawn to Quebec banner (07.2014)_v6 I’m delighted to announce that my illustrated column, Drawn to Quebec,  has been nominated for a provincial ‘Best Column Writing’ award! Scroll to the bottom for links to all the articles in the series, or keep reading to see what the nomination, from the Quebec Chronicle-Telegraph‘s editorial team, says: D2Q_Vineyard to Sante_QCT (12.17.2014)_5 “Bethann’s illustrated column, Drawn to Quebec, has been a breath of fresh air for the editorial team and our readership. Specifically, she raised our awareness of issues that we didn’t know. Her extensive knowledge of the natural world, combined with years’ of teaching experience, enable her to write in a conversational fashion, including the readers in her articles by using “we” and “our”. This approach has helped not just our readers, but our staff, feel as though they’re being spoken with (not at), and they’re actively participating in discovery and exploration of Quebec City’s nature/culture overlap. Continue reading Drawn to Quebec: an illustrated newspaper column

Drawn to Natural History: A sketching workshop in Quebec City

I’ll be leading a workshop on the synergy between art and science in a couple of weeks! If you’re in Quebec City and want to join us, scroll down for all the details.

Looking for a workshop near you? Check the calendar for upcoming workshops, or contact me to schedule a workshop in your area!

Polyphemous moth (02.2014)_sigDrawn to History: Exploring the synergy between art and the natural sciences.

Turn back time to an era when art and the natural sciences were inseparable!

Frog in pants_v4_rs_wmJoin local artist Bethann G. Merkle for a rare event held in the Morrin Centre’s Victorian-era science lab.

Following an illustrated talk with special emphasis on local natural history and scientists, you will enjoy a series of facilitated sketching and observation activities.

Bethann will teach you how to record your observations of nature specimens using a combination of sketches and notes. Continue reading Drawn to Natural History: A sketching workshop in Quebec City

3 reasons why we should tell stories about scientists, not just science.

1. Human details tangibly bring Conserving Quebec caribou_Ia story to life.

Being able to relate to a researcher is key to having an interest in what that person researches. When a science story includes the scientist, a reader can hope for a quirky anecdote, a personal revelation that is highly intriguing, or even a zany description of the scientist’s physical attributes. Continue reading 3 reasons why we should tell stories about scientists, not just science.