Meteor: The honest podcast about scicomm with impact

Decorative image only: Screenshot of website linked to in blog post. Follow links to access full content.

Last year, I launched Meteor, a podcast, with friend, collaborator, and fellow dreamer-schemer Virginia Schutte. We just wrapped Season 2 a few weeks ago, and I am so pleased to have so much to share with you!

We started Meteor because we crave advanced-user conversations with other mid-career scicomm professionals (like us!). We intended to use Meteor to learn and grow together, and check each other when we need it. Our plan was to dig into things as wide-ranging as branding, projects that matter, privilege, and inclusive science communication, with actionable, tangible steps to level up.

I have been working in scicomm for over 20 years, and it’s like you are inside my head. ~Meteor listener

In the first ten episodes, we covered all sorts of topics. Here are a few of my favorites:

  • What we think scicomm needs
  • Branding is not a dirty word
  • The privilege of volunteering
  • Balance, schmalance (about work-life balance)
Continue reading “Meteor: The honest podcast about scicomm with impact”

3 reasons why we should tell stories about scientists, not just science.

1. Human details tangibly bring Conserving Quebec caribou_Ia story to life.

Being able to relate to a researcher is key to having an interest in what that person researches. When a science story includes the scientist, a reader can hope for a quirky anecdote, a personal revelation that is highly intriguing, or even a zany description of the scientist’s physical attributes. Continue reading “3 reasons why we should tell stories about scientists, not just science.”

On the bison trail – Prince Albert National Park bison research

Prince Albert National Park, PANP, 2013

The Sturgeon River plains bison, located in Saskatchewan’s Prince Albert National Park (PANP), belong to one of three fully wild (i.e. free-ranging) bison herds in Canada.  It is said to be the only such Canadian herd found within historic bison range.  This herd, and the on-going research focused on them, has been a significant focus for us for the past three years.  The following links lead to field notes, published articles, and photography galleries related to the project.  This archive will be updated as new material is published.

HINT: Check out the field notes (last section) for personal anecdotes about what it’s like to follow bison through the woods for months.

Articles (popular & peer-reviewed)

Photo galleries*

*Photos are available for licensing (commercial, non-profit, and educational use) and art prints.  Contact us for details.

Research 

Field notes