Finding great scicomm & presentation images for free (Using Images-A Best Practices Primer, Part 2)

This article is the second in a series aimed at helping you enhance your #scicomm and #sciart by avoiding #visualplagiarism. It will do so by laying out some best practices for dealing with images (which are, by their nature) visual intellectual property protected by copyrights.

NOTE: I am not a lawyer, and no part of this article or series should be construed as legal advice. 

Please chime in, in the comments or by contacting me, if you have suggestions for how to enhance this article or the series.

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The internet is full of great images you can ethically and legally use for free, like these ofHedy Lamarr (co-developer of frequency hopping, the forerunner of the internet) and one of her patent figures. (Source: public domain images from Wikimedia Commons & Google Patents.)

FINDING GREAT FREE SCICOMM IMAGES

In the first article in this series, we looked at essential definitions at play when using images. We also ran through a series of tips, including how to approach someone about asking permission to reproduce their image, the constraints of U.S. Fair Use laws, and more.

In this article, we’ll focus on how to find great images to use in your SciComm, whether that is a conference talk or poster, a lecture in the class you teach, an outreach project, or something else.

There are several ways to access free high-quality images. The following are recommended: Continue reading Finding great scicomm & presentation images for free (Using Images-A Best Practices Primer, Part 2)

April 2017 CommNatural Newsletter: Migration, multimedia sketching & more

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Happy April, dear readers!

The weather is getting warmer and warmer. In addition to obvious shifts in the garden, migratory critters are coming back to the high plains.

My favorite are the turkey vultures that roots on campus. On warm breezy afternoons, they cruise low over the cottonwoods around our neighborhood.

In recognition of the vultures, bluebirds back out at our favorite hiking spot, and all the plants leafing out, this month’s newsletter looks at some familiar things from some fresh angles.

Keep reading. This month’s newsletter focuses on a mixed media sketching/pring-making technique, the launch of an image-use best practices blog series, and lots of news and events.

Happy sketching,

April Table of Contents

  • Insight: How and why migrations speak to us
  • Sketching Tip/Artful Classrooms: Solvent transfers (a printmaking technique)
  • Artful Science: Ethics of using reference/source images for art making and science communication
  • News & Events:
    • Drawn to Science plenary talk at American Fisheries Society’s western division annual conference scheduled for 5/23
    • Drawing for Science Communication symposium talk at American Fisheries Society’s western division annual conference also scheduled for 5/23. See the conference program for details.
    • Get your portable sketching kit, plus spring greeting cards and gifts from me! 🙂
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Tips for ethical and legal use of images in science presentations and other science communication (Using Images-A Best Practices Primer, Part 1)

When you are looking for great images to communicate about science, the internet is a treasure trove. But it is easy to overstep legal and ethical boundaries.

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Where your images come from, and how you get them, matters. (Sketching jackrabbit specimens, ©2017)

This article is the first in a series aimed at helping you enhance your #scicomm and #sciart by avoiding #visualplagiarism. It will do so by laying out some best practices for dealing with images (which are, by their nature) visual intellectual property protected by copyrights.

NOTE: I am not a lawyer, and no part of this article or series should be construed as legal advice. 

Please chime in, in the comments or by contacting me, if you have suggestions for how to enhance this article or the series.


DEFINITIONS & TIPS FOR ETHICAL AND LEGAL IMAGE USE

Images are a crucial element of compelling science communication.

After all, something like 50% of our brains are keyed in to visual stimuli. And, more than ever, compelling images are easy to find on the internet. That makes the internet a powerful #VisualSciComm tool.

However, like most tools, how you use the internet to source images can have serious implications — in this case for your outreach, reputation, and efficacy. Continue reading Tips for ethical and legal use of images in science presentations and other science communication (Using Images-A Best Practices Primer, Part 1)

October 2016 Newsletter: Exploring creative thinking (downtime, research & more)

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Mid-semester, responsibilities, due dates, and life can feel overwhelming. But, taking breaks and doing “other” activities are essential strategies for fostering your own work and creative thought.

I’ve remarked many times that reading, writing, and drawing are three ways that I manage to ‘suspend’ time. In all three activities, my brain slips into a hyper-focused dimension in which I have no sense of time passing.

And while this brain space can be problematic when I have a finite amount of time for it, allowing ourselves to work and think outside of time is not just pleasurable, it’s really important.

After all, a body of research indicates that arts activities are often key to science breakthroughs.

This month’s newsletter shares a few perspectives on why and how to engage in leisure and arts activities.

Enjoy and happy thinking!

October Table of Contents

  • Sketching Tip: Reproduceability – Packing tape transfers
  • Artful Science: Creativity Research
  • Artful Classrooms: Necessary Leisure
  • Sketchbook Snapshot: Experimenting through repetition
  • News & Events:
    • Illustrated greeting cards for staying in touch with folks as autumn hits full-stride
    • Drawn to Wildlife (sketching for scientists workshop, hosted by the Wildlife Society, Wyoming Chapter)
    • Bee Germs illustrations are live!
    • University of Wyoming SciArt Symposium follow-up

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