Drawn to the West: a syndicated sciart column

If there’s anything I enjoy more than sketching and illustrating the world around me, it’s sharing…

…what I discover or wonder about with others through #scicomm projects and workshops. That’s what compelled me to launch Drawn to Quebec, an illustrated #sciart column about nature and culture, nearly one year ago.

Recently, I unpacked all my art materials, guide books, and gear into a new home on the windswept grasslands of Wyoming. And so I’ve returned to visually capturing what makes life so compelling in the high, dry, and sunny Mountain West of my childhood. Continue reading “Drawn to the West: a syndicated sciart column”

Conserving Quebec’s Caribou

The Conserving Quebec’s Caribou series came to life at a potluck,

where I was speaking with Chrystel, now a PhD student at Université Laval (Quebec City, Quebec). It turns out Chrystel’s fiancée Alex is also a caribou researcher, although they study different questions in different herds.

During the interview process, what struck me was how differently Chrystel and Alex thought about their work, their study species, and the issues that influence them.

Continue reading “Conserving Quebec’s Caribou”

3 reasons why we should tell stories about scientists, not just science.

1. Human details tangibly bring Conserving Quebec caribou_Ia story to life.

Being able to relate to a researcher is key to having an interest in what that person researches. When a science story includes the scientist, a reader can hope for a quirky anecdote, a personal revelation that is highly intriguing, or even a zany description of the scientist’s physical attributes. Continue reading “3 reasons why we should tell stories about scientists, not just science.”